Archives

Alien: Covenant

Alien: Covenant is a 2017 science-fiction/action-horror film directed and produced by Ridley Scott and written by John Logan and Dante Harper, from a story by Michael Green and Jack Paglen. A joint American and British production, the film is a sequel to Prometheus (2012) and is the second installment in the Alien prequel series and the sixth installment overall in the Alien film series, as well as the third directed by Scott. The film features returning star Michael Fassbender and Katherine Waterston, with Billy Crudup, Danny McBride, and Demián Bichir in supporting roles. It follows the crew of a colony ship that lands on an uncharted planet and makes a terrifying discovery.

Plot

The crew of a colony ship, bound for a remote planet, discover an uncharted paradise with a threat beyond their imagination, and must attempt a harrowing escape.

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Super Hero Taisen Z

Kamen Rider × Super Sentai × Space Sheriff: Super Hero Taisen Z (仮面ライダー×スーパー戦隊×宇宙刑事 スーパーヒーロー大戦Z Kamen Raidā × Sūpā Sentai × Uchū Keiji Supā Hīrō Taisen Zetto) is a 2013 tokusatsu superhero film which features a crossover between the Kamen Rider, Super Sentai, and the Space Sheriff Series, representing the Metal Heroes series as a whole. It is also a sequel to the 2012 film Kamen Rider × Super Sentai: Super Hero Taisen.

The protagonists of Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie, Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters, and Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger are featured, but the casts of Kamen Rider Wizard, Zyuden Sentai Kyoryuger, and Kamen Rider Fourze also participate in the film as well as the return of Kamen Rider Super-1. The version of Inazuman from Movie War Ultimatum also appears.

Plot

A new evil organization known as Space Shocker, which are led by the magic-using Space Ikadevil and Space Spider Man, threatens the Earth by causing an unknown phenomenon. The Space Sheriffs Gavan type-G and Sharivan are sent to execute all wizards on Earth in response to the threat and begins to attack Kamen Riders Wizard and Beast. The Space Crime Syndicate Madou, who were once defeated by the original Sharivan return, to cause even more havoc in the world. During this, Yoko finds a mysterious little robot called Psycholon which Space Shocker and the Madou are after.

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Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie

Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie (宇宙刑事ギャバン THE MOVIE Uchū Keiji Gyaban Za Mūbī) is a 2012 Japanese tokusatsu superhero film to commemorate the 30th Anniversary of the Metal Hero Series’ first entry, Space Sheriff Gavan, and is a sequel to the Space Sheriff series.[1] Kenji Ohba, Toshiaki Nishizawa, and Shōzō Iizuka reprise their roles from the original television series.

Plot

Fulfilling their fifteen-year-old childhood dream to venture into space, Geki Jumonji and Toya Okuma join SARD and take a mission to Mars with their childhood friend Itsuki Kawai giving them good luck pendants so she can be with them in spirit. However, the two are labeled MIA when their space shuttle mysteriously disappears.

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Prometheus

Prometheus is a 2012 science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott, written by Jon Spaihts and Damon Lindelof and starring Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender, Guy Pearce, Idris Elba, Logan Marshall-Green, and Charlize Theron. It is set in the late 21st century and centers on the crew of the spaceship Prometheus as it follows a star map discovered among the artifacts of several ancient Earth cultures. Seeking the origins of humanity, the crew arrives on a distant world and discovers a threat that could cause the extinction of the human species.

Plot

Following clues to the origin of mankind, a team finds a structure on a distant moon, but they soon realize they are not alone.

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Space Sheriff Gavan Legend

Uchuu Keiji Gavan Legend (宇宙刑事ギャバン伝説 Uchū Keiji Gyaban Densetsu, Space Sheriff Gavan Legend) is a special DVD released with Televi-Kun in 2012 to promote the film Uchuu Keiji Gavan: The Movie. It features the second Space Sheriff Gavan, Geki Jumonji and his partner, Shelly as well as the members of the Space Mafia Maku.

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Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger vs. Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie

Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger vs. Space Sheriff Gavan: The Movie (海賊戦隊ゴーカイジャーVS宇宙刑事ギャバン THE MOVIE Kaizoku Sentai Gōkaijā Tai Uchū Keiji Gyaban Za Mūbī) is a superhero film adaptation of the 35th anniversary Super Sentai Series Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger. The film is part the Super Sentai VS film series, but unlike previous films which featured two Super Sentai teaming up, it features a team up between the Gokaigers and the eponymous Space Sheriff Gavan, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Gavan and Toei’s Metal Hero Series as a whole. The movie also features the debut of the main three heroes of Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters. The catchphrase of the movie is “Space Pirates vs. Space Sheriff” (宇宙海賊VS宇宙刑事 Uchū Kaizoku Tai Uchū Keiji).

Gokaiger vs. Gavan was released on January 21, 2012, and features the casts and characters of both Gokaiger and Gavan, Kenji Ohba not only portrays his character from Gavan, but also reprises his roles from Battle Fever J and Denshi Sentai Denziman.

The film debuted at #2 on its opening weekend at the Japanese box-office with a gross of ¥160,750,000, exceeding the opening sales of 2011’s Tensou Sentai Goseiger vs. Shinkenger: Epic on Ginmaku by approximately 14%.

Plot

The Gokaigers are on a mission to save Space Sheriff Gavan from the evil clutches of Ashurada, a member of the Zangyack Empire and an ancestor of Don Horror.

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Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem

Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem (also known as AVP:R) is a 2007 American science fiction action film[4] directed by the Brothers Strause (Colin and Greg Strause) in their directorial debut and written by Shane Salerno. The film stars Steven Pasquale, Reiko Aylesworth, John Ortiz, Johnny Lewis, and Ariel Gade. It is a sequel to the 2004 film Alien vs. Predator and the second and latest installment in the Alien vs. Predator franchise, continuing the crossover between the Alien and Predator franchises.

Plot

Warring Alien and Predator races descend on a rural Colorado town, where unsuspecting residents must band together for any chance of survival.

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Alien Resurrection

Alien Resurrection is a 1997 American science fiction horror film[4] directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet, written by Joss Whedon, and starring Sigourney Weaver and Winona Ryder. It is the fourth installment in the Alien film series, and the final installment in the original series. It was filmed at the 20th Century Fox studios in Los Angeles, California.

Plot

200 years after her death, Ellen Ripley is revived as a powerful human/alien hybrid clone. Along with a crew of space pirates, she must again battle the deadly aliens and stop them from reaching Earth.

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Alien 3

Alien 3 (stylized as ALIEN³) is a 1992 American science fiction action horror film directed by David Fincher and written by David Giler, Walter Hill and Larry Ferguson from a story by Vincent Ward. It stars Sigourney Weaver reprising her role as Ellen Ripley and is the third film installment in the Alien franchise, preceded by Aliens (1986) and succeeded by Alien Resurrection (1997).

Plot

After her last encounter, Ellen Ripley crash-lands on Fiorina 161, a maximum security prison. When a series of strange and deadly events occur shortly after her arrival, Ripley realizes that she has brought along an unwelcome visitor.

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Akira

Akira (Japanese: アキラ Hepburn: Akira) is a 1988 Japanese animated post-apocalyptic cyberpunk film directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, produced by Ryōhei Suzuki and Shunzō Katō, and written by Otomo and Izo Hashimoto, based on Otomo’s 1982 manga of the same name. The film had a production budget of ¥1.1 billion ($9 million), making it the most expensive anime film of its time.

Set in a dystopian 2019, Akira tells the story of Shōtarō Kaneda, a leader of a local biker gang whose childhood friend, Tetsuo Shima, acquires incredible telekinetic abilities after a motorcycle accident, eventually threatening an entire military complex amidst chaos and rebellion in the sprawling futuristic metropolis of Neo-Tokyo. While most of the character designs and settings were adapted from the manga, the plot differs considerably, and does not include much of the last half of the manga. The soundtrack, which draws heavily from traditional Indonesian gamelan as well as Japanese noh music, was composed by Shōji Yamashiro and performed by Geinoh Yamashirogumi.

Akira premiered in Japan on 16 July 1988 by Toho, and was released the following year in the United States by pioneering animation distributor Streamline Pictures. It garnered an international cult following after its theatrical and VHS releases, eventually earning over $80 million worldwide from home video sales. It is widely regarded by critics as one of the greatest animated and science fiction films ever made, as well as a landmark in Japanese animation. It is also a landmark film in the cyberpunk genre, particularly the Japanese cyberpunk subgenre, as well as adult animation. The film had a significant impact on popular culture worldwide, paving the way for the growth of anime and Japanese popular culture in the Western world as well as influencing numerous works in animation, comics, film, music, television and video games.

Plot

A secret military project endangers Neo-Tokyo when it turns a biker gang member into a rampaging psychic psychopath who can only be stopped by two teenagers and a group of psychics.

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OVA • Transformers: Zone

Transformers: Zone (トランスフォーマー ゾーン Toransufōmā: Zōn) is a 1990 one-shot OVA exclusive to Japan in the fictional Transformers universe. It was released on July 21, 1990 on VHS and on April 21, 2004 on DVD in Japan. An unofficial fan-made English dub was released on TFCog.com in March 2004.

Story

Following on from Victory, the mysterious three-faced insectoid being, Violenjiger dispatches the nine “Great Decepticon Generals”—Devastator, Menasor, Bruticus, Trypticon, Predaking, Abominus, King Poseidon, Overlord and BlackZarak—to acquire “Zone Energy”, destroying the planet Feminia to obtain the world’s store and in search of the powerful Zodiac. Caught in the destruction of the planet, Star Saber is rescued by Dai Atlas, who then repels an attack by the Decepticons on Earth, and is appointed the new Autobot commander at the conclusion of the episode, following a battle with the Decepticons and unlocking the power of the Zodiac that was found on Earth.

Characters

The cast of Zone is composed heavily of Micromasters, who also made up much of the toyline. Dai Atlas is a “Powered Master”, so named for his motorized gimmick, as is his combining partner Sonic Bomber—the toyline also featured another partner for them, Roadfire, who was not in the episode. The solitary Decepticons in the toyline were the Race Track Patrol, and Metrotitan, a redeco of the Autobot city Metroplex, neither of whom appeared in animated form. None of the Decepticon Generals ever appeared in toy form.

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Transformers: Victory

Transformers: Victory (トランスフォーマー ビクトリー Toransufōmā: Bikutorī) is an anime series produced by Toei Animation. It is a Japanese-produced spin-off of the well-known original Transformers cartoon, and the final complete animated series from the original “Generation 1” era.

Development

Following the conclusion of the American Transformers cartoon series in 1987, Takara, the Japanese producers of the Transformers toyline, opted to create unique anime for their shores to advertise their own version of the Transformers toyline, which began to grow further and further apart from its American progenitor. After Transformers: The Headmasters in 1987 and Transformers: Super-God Masterforce in 1988, Transformers: Victory was produced in 1989.

These Japanese-exclusive Transformers series had been moving further and further away from the stylistic roots of the American series, and Victory represents this divergence at its greatest. The visual style of Victory is derived heavily from the anime of the time, with the transformations of the robots being treated as more monumental, presented through more dynamic and lengthy stock footage. Still frame effects and re-used animation were used wherever possible to compensate for high levels of animation compared to previous series, possibly due to budget cuts at the time.

Despite his apparent death in The Transformers: The Movie, Wheeljack returned during the death of God Ginrai/Birth of Victory Leo saga, along with Perceptor from the original series, with God Ginrai and Minerva from Transformers: Super God Masterforce returning too. The series was released in the UK on DVD in Region 2, PAL format on December 26, 2006. In 2008, Madman Entertainment released the series on DVD in Australia in Region 4, PAL format. Transformers: Victory was released with The Headmasters and Super-God Masterforce in the USA, released by Shout! Factory. It was released on August 28, 2012.

Story

Victory is the story of the new Autobot Supreme Commander, Star Saber, defending the Earth against the forces of Deszaras (though commonly in the English fandom is known by “Deathsaurus” a butchered version of his Japanese name), the Decepticons’ new Emperor of Destruction. Deszaras desires the planet’s energy to reactivate his massive planet-destroying fortress, sealed away in the Dark Nebula long ago by Star Saber. The series eschews the story arc-based approach of Headmasters and Masterforce, returning to the American show’s method of episodic adventures that did little to alter the status quo of the series, with a heavy emphasis on action, complemented by dynamic animation.[1] Its cast consists almost entirely of brand new characters (although there are some guest appearances from characters on earlier shows).

Victory’s story is told over thirty-two original episodes. However, the broadcast series also includes six additional clip shows – bringing the total number of broadcast episodes to thirty-eight. Additionally, after the end of the series, another six additional clip shows were created by Masumi Kaneda, which were available only through home video and seldom-seen regional Japanese broadcasts, taking the total number of Victory episodes to forty-four.

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Transformers: Super-God Masterforce

Transformers: Super-God Masterforce (トランスフォーマー 超神マスターフォース Toransufōmā: Chōjin Masutāfōsu) is a Japanese Transformers line of toys and anime series that ran from April 12, 1988 to March 7, 1989 for 42 episodes. On July 3, 2006 the series was released on DVD in the UK, and it was aired on AnimeCentral in the UK a few years later. In 2008, Madman Entertainment released the series on DVD in Australia in Region 4, PAL format. On May 1, 2012, the series was released on DVD in the US.

Story

The core concept of Masterforce begins with the human beings themselves rising up to fight and defend their home, rather than the alien Transformers doing it for them. Going hand-in-hand with this idea, the Japanese incarnations of the Autobot Pretenders actually shrink down to pass for normal human beings, whose emotions and strengths they value and wish to safeguard.[1] The Decepticon Pretenders tend to remain being large monsters, unless they battle in their robot forms. Later on children and adults would be recruited to become Headmaster Juniors for both the Autobots and Decepticons but as the story progressed the story focuses more on the Godmasters (released as Powermasters in the West) and they became the more powerful Transformers on the show. The Godmasters themselves are human beings with the ability to merge with their Transtectors (robot bodies). Most of the Godmasters would be adults with the exception of Clouder who is about the same age as the Junior Headmasters. Other characters would later appear including Black Zarak who would later merge with the Decepticons leader; Devil Z for the final battle and for the Autobots comes Grand Maximus who has a Pretender guise and is Fortress Maximus’ younger brother. Also the Firecons make a brief appearance in one episode and a robot who transforms into a gun (similar to G1 Megatron) was given to Cancer of the Headmaster Junior Decepticons as a gift from Lady Mega. His name was Browning (or BM in the dub). The Decepticons also had the Targetmaster Seacons under their command, but like the Pretenders, they were sentient robots and didn’t require humans to operate them. The Autobots would also gain the help of another sentient robot called Sixknight (Or as he is known outside Japan; Quickswitch), who appeared on Earth as a travelling warrior who wanted to challenge Ginrai (who is the Godmaster of the body of Optimus Prime) to a battle, but soon decided for himself to fight for the Autobots cause. The story basically tells the efforts of the heroic Autobot forces as they protect the Earth from the Decepticons. Only this time round, human characters played a more important role than in other Transformers series.

Development

With the conclusion of the US Transformers cartoon series in 1987, Japan produced their first exclusive anime series, Transformers: The Headmasters, to replace the fourth and final US season and to carry out the story concepts begun in The Transformers: The Movie and carried on through the third season, using the existing cast and adding the eponymous Headmasters into the mix. With the completion of the series, the evil Decepticons had finally been forced off Earth, and the stage was set for the beginning of Super-God Masterforce.

Although nominally occurring in the same continuity as the previous Transformers series, there was a very obvious effort on head writer Masumi Kaneda’s part to make Masterforce a “fresh start” as a mecha story, introducing an entirely new cast of characters from scratch, rather than using any of the previous ones. To this end, although the toys are mostly the same in both Japan and the West (barring some different color schemes), the characters which they represent are vastly different—most prominently, Powermaster Optimus Prime’s counterpart is Ginrai, a human trucker who combines with a transtector (a non-sentient Transformer body, a concept lifted from Headmasters) to become a Transformer himself, the same applies to the other Powermasters’ counterparts; the Godmasters. The Pretender figures released during that year were the same but in Masterforce the Autobot pretenders disguise themselves regular sized humans that can wear normal clothing instead of being giant humans wearing armor as they were in contemporary Marvel comics.

The attempt to start things afresh with Masterforce does give rise to some continuity quirks, however, such as Earth technology being portrayed as contemporary, rather than futuristic as in 2010 and Headmasters, and some characters being totally unaware of what Transformers are, even though they have been public figures for over two decades. Similarly, the show never supplied the viewer with the full backstory – within the main 42 episodes of the series, important aspects such as what the true villain, Devil Z is or who BlackZarak is are never explained. Even the timeframe of the show was never revealed, with the series taking place an indeterminate amount of time after Headmasters. Most of these facts would all be revealed later in made-for-video clip shows and other media, including a Special Secrets episode where both Goh and Grand Maximus would explain and reveal several pieces of trivia about the show.

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Transformers: The Headmasters

Transformers: The Headmasters (トランスフォーマー ザ★ヘッドマスターズ Toransufōmā: Za Heddomasutāzu) is a Japanese anime television series that is a part of the Transformers robot superhero franchise. It aired from July 1987 to March 1988, and its 17:00-17:30 timeslot was used to broadcast Mashin Hero Wataru at the end of its broadcast.

Development

Initially, Takara, the Japanese producers of the Transformers toyline, imported the American Transformers cartoon series from 1985 to 1986. When the series came to an end with the three-part miniseries “The Rebirth” in 1987, however, Takara decided to continue the series themselves, declining to import The Rebirth and instead creating a full-length 35-episode spin-off series, Transformers: The Headmasters (two additional clips episodes were produced after the fact for direct-to-video release). Supplanting The Rebirth’s position in Japanese continuity, The Headmasters occurred one year after The Return of Optimus Prime, introducing the title characters to the Transformers universe in a different way. Whereas in western fiction, the Headmasters result from the merging of a Transformer with an organic alien being from the planet Nebulos, the Headmasters of the Japanese series are a group of small Cybertronians who departed the planet millions of years ago and crash-landed on the inhospitable planet Master. To survive its harsh climate, a select few Cybertronians constructed larger bodies called “Transtectors”, to which they connected as the heads.

Story

Six years after the decisive battle against Unicron, when a group of rebellious Headmasters led by Weirdwolf joined with Galvatron’s Decepticons in an attack on Cybertron, the bot Headmasters, led by Cerebros return to their home planet to aid in its defense. The situation soon gets worse when it is revealed that Vector Sigma, the super-computer at the planet’s heart, was destabilizing, and Optimus Prime again sacrifices his life to save Cybertron. This soon proves to be only delaying the inevitable, however, when a bomb attack instigated by Scorponok turns Cybertron into a burnt-out, inhospitable husk. Rodimus Prime departs to search for a new planet for the Transformers to live on, leaving Cerebros in command, operating from the planet Athenia. Meanwhile, Scorponok replaces Galvatron – who had vanished in the explosion – as Decepticon leader, constructing a personal Transtector so that he can battle Cerebros’ own giant form, Fortress Maximus, and redubbing himself MegaZarak.

Although populated mainly with new characters, The Headmasters featured characters from all previous seasons, including new versions of Soundwave and Blaster, rebuilt after a duel that destroyed them both as Soundblaster and Twincast. Human Daniel Witwicky and his young Autobot friend Wheelie also played major roles in the series, serving as the youthful characters for the audience to identify with. More new characters were introduced when Galvatron returned to leadership and the Decepticons embarked on a space voyage, ransacking planets in a chain of stories that introduced the Horrorcons, Autobot and Decepticon clones. Later, the Decepticon ninja six-changer Sixshot kills Ultra Magnus, and the Autobot Headmasters manage to destroy Galvatron, leaving Scorponok to become leader of the Decepticons again. When the Decepticons then return to Master, refugees from the planet are caught in a plasma bomb accident that fuses them to the arms of several Autobots and Decepticons, creating the Targetmasters, and in a final move, Scorponok attempts the destruction of Earth, only to be foiled, thanks in part to a traitorous Sixshot.

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Aliens

Aliens is a 1986 American science fiction action film written and directed by James Cameron, produced by Gale Anne Hurd and starring Sigourney Weaver. It is the sequel to the 1979 film Alien and the second installment in the Alien franchise. The film follows Weaver’s character Ellen Ripley as she returns to the moon where her crew encountered the hostile Alien creature, this time accompanied by a unit of space marines. Additional roles are played by Carrie Henn, Michael Biehn, Paul Reiser, Lance Henriksen, Jenette Goldstein, William Hope, Al Matthews, and Bill Paxton.

Plot

Ellen Ripley is rescued by a deep salvage team after being in hypersleep for 57 years. The moon that the Nostromo visited has been colonized, but contact is lost. This time, colonial marines have impressive firepower, but will that be enough?

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OVA • Transformers: Scramble City

Fight! Super Robot Life-Form Transformers: Scramble City Activation (戦え!超ロボット生命体トランスフォーマー スクランブルシティ発動編 Tatakae! Chō Robotto Seimei-Tai Toransufōmā: Sukuranburu Shiti Hatsudō-hen), sometimes referred to as just Scramble City (スクランブルシティ Sukuranburu Shiti) is an episode of The Transformers released as an OVA (Original Video Animation) in Japan in April 1986. It was created as a promotional video for the new line of ‘Scramble City’ toys and the cassettes were paired with the toy sets. Despite strong belief (such as that voiced on the 20th Anniversary DVD bonus commentary for the episode), it was not meant to introduce Japanese audiences to the new characters from The Transformers: The Movie (considering Ultra Magnus, Ramhorn, Steeljaw, and Ratbat are the only ones from the film that appear in it). Chronologically, it takes place years before the movie during the early stages of construction on Autobot City.

Plot

Beginning with a recap of the coming of the Transformers to Earth and the story of Devastator, the OVA then gets its original story underway, as the Autobots are shown to be in the midst of constructing the powerful “Scramble City”, overseen by their newest arrival, Ultra Magnus. When the Decepticons learn of this, their combiner robots are deployed to attack, and a battle between them and their Autobot counterparts ensues, focusing on their “Scramble Power” – the interchangeability of the individual limbs – to the extent that at one point, Breakdown of the Stunticons connects to Superion to damage him. At the OVA’s conclusion, Scramble City is activated and assumes its robot mode of Metroplex to rout the Decepticons. However, from the ocean depths, the Decepticons’ own city, Trypticon, rises.

This cliffhanger was never resolved as no direct sequel was ever produced. An extended commercial, called Scramble City Toys but often mistakenly identified as Scramble City 2, was released, but rather than wrap up the cliffhanger, it retold the OVA through stop-motion animation of the toys themselves, with one addition – the introduction of Galvatron, erroneously presented as one of Megatron’s troops, rather than the recreated Decepticon leader himself.

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Airwolf

Airwolf is an American television series that ran from 1984 until 1987. The program centers on a high-technology military helicopter, code named Airwolf, and its crew as they undertake various exotic missions, many involving espionage, with a Cold War theme.

The show was created by Donald P. Bellisario and was produced over four seasons. The first three seasons’ main cast consisted of Jan-Michael Vincent, Ernest Borgnine, and Alex Cord, and from the second season onwards Jean Bruce Scott was added as a regular. The show originally aired on CBS and after the original series was cancelled, a fourth season, with an entirely new cast and on a much smaller budget, was filmed in Canada for the USA Network.

The show’s distinctive musical score, which was originally orchestral, but shifted to more synthesizer-based arrangements early in the second season, was composed and mainly conducted by Sylvester Levay. Udi Harpaz conducted the scores for many later second- and third-season episodes.

Plot

As part of a deal with an intelligence agency to look for his missing brother, a renegade pilot goes on missions with an advanced battle helicopter.

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The Transformers

The Transformers is a half-hour American animated robot superhero television series which originally aired from September 17, 1984 to November 11, 1987. The first of many series in the Transformers franchise, it was based upon Hasbro’s Transformers toy line (itself based upon the Diaclone and Microman toy lines originally created by Japanese toy manufacturer Takara) and depicts a war among giant robots that can transform into vehicles and other objects.

Co-produced between Marvel Productions and Sunbow Productions for first-run syndication, animation for the series was done by Toei Animation in Japan, and later by AKOM in South Korea. The series was supplemented by a feature film, The Transformers: The Movie (1986), taking place between the second and third seasons.

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Space Cobra

The anime series Space Cobra (スペースコブラ Supēsu Kobura) is based on the manga series of the same name written by Buichi Terasawa. The series is directed by Osamu Dezaki and produced by TMS Entertainment. Loosely based in the first eight volumes of the manga, the episodes follows Cobra, a spatial pirate, who enjoys an adventurous life along with his gynoid partner Armaroid Lady.

Space Cobra broadcast between October 7, 1982 and May 19, 1983 on Fuji Television.

The series use two pieces of theme music, an opening theme and ending theme: “Cobra” (コブラ Kobura) and “Secret Desire” (シークレット・デザイアー Shīkuretto Dezaiā) both by Yoko Maeno.

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Space Sheriff Gavan

Space Sheriff Gavan (宇宙刑事ギャバン Uchū Keiji Gyaban), known also as Space Cop Gabin, is a Japanese Tokusatsu series produced by Toei Company. It is the first installment of the Metal Hero Series franchise and the first installment in the Space Sheriff series. It aired on TV Asahi from March 5, 1982 to February 25, 1983.

Plot

Armed with a Combat Suit and other high-tech weapons/vehicles, a young space warrior fights to protect the Earth from the evil Makuu Empire, which holds his father captive.

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Ulysses 31

Ulysses 31 (宇宙伝説ユリシーズ31 Uchū Densetsu Yurishīzu Sātīwan, lit. Space Legend Ulysses 31) (French: Ulysse 31) is a French-Japanese animated television series (1981) that updates the Greek mythology of Odysseus (known as “Ulysses” in Latin) to the 31st century. The show comprised 26 half-hour episodes and was produced by DIC Audiovisuel in conjunction with anime studio TMS Entertainment.

Plot

The plot line of the series (made by the French Jean Chalopin) describes the struggles of Ulysses and his crew against the divine entities that rule the universe, the ancient gods from Greek mythology. The Gods of Olympus are angered when Ulysses, commander of the giant spaceship Odyssey, kills the giant Cyclops to save a group of enslaved children, including his son. Zeus sentences Ulysses to travel the universe with his crew frozen until he finds the Kingdom of Hades, at which point his crew will be revived and he will be able to return to Earth. Along the way they encounter numerous other famous figures from Greek mythology who have been given a futuristic twist.

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Alien

Alien is a 1979 science fiction horror film directed by Ridley Scott and written by Dan O’Bannon. Based on a story by O’Bannon and Ronald Shusett, it follows the crew of the commercial space tug Nostromo who encounter the eponymous Alien, a deadly and aggressive extraterrestrial set loose on the ship. The film stars Tom Skerritt, Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt, Ian Holm, and Yaphet Kotto. It was produced by Gordon Carroll, David Giler and Walter Hill through their company Brandywine Productions, and was distributed by 20th Century Fox. Giler and Hill revised and made additions to the script; Shusett was executive producer. The Alien and its accompanying artifacts were designed by the Swiss artist H. R. Giger, while concept artists Ron Cobb and Chris Foss designed the more human settings.

Plot

After a space merchant vessel perceives an unknown transmission as a distress call, its landing on the source moon finds one of the crew attacked by a mysterious lifeform, and they soon realize that its life cycle has merely begun.

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The Mystery of the Arcadia (OAV)

Space Pirate Captain Harlock is a manga series written and illustrated by Leiji Matsumoto. It was serialized in Play Comic from 1977 to 1979, with the chapters collected into five tankōbon volumes by Akita Shoten. The series follows the titular Captain, an outcast turned space pirate after he rebelled against Earth’s Government and humanity’s general apathy. Space Pirate Captain Harlock was adapted into an anime television series in 1978 directed by Rintaro and produced by Toei Animation.

Plot

In 2977, mankind has space colonies, machines do all the work and everyone just wants to have fun. When deadly plant-based aliens that look like women attack the Earth in order to colonize it, only one rogue captain can stop them.

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Space Pirate Captain Harlock

Space Pirate Captain Harlock is a manga series written and illustrated by Leiji Matsumoto. It was serialized in Play Comic from 1977 to 1979, with the chapters collected into five tankōbon volumes by Akita Shoten. The series follows the titular Captain, an outcast turned space pirate after he rebelled against Earth’s Government and humanity’s general apathy. Space Pirate Captain Harlock was adapted into an anime television series in 1978 directed by Rintaro and produced by Toei Animation.

Plot

In 2977, mankind has space colonies, machines do all the work and everyone just wants to have fun. When deadly plant-based aliens that look like women attack the Earth in order to colonize it, only one rogue captain can stop them.

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Captain Future

In 1978, one year after Hamilton’s death, Toei Animation of Japan produced a Captain Future (キャプテン・フューチャー Kyaputen Fyūchā) anime television series of 53 episodes, based on 13 original Hamilton stories. Despite the differences in cultural references and medium, the animated series was true to the original in many ways, from the didactic scientific explanations to the emphasis on the usefulness of brains as opposed to brawn.

Plot

Curtis Newton, aka Captain Future, is an orphan. His parents died in their artificial satellite while he was an infant. His father was a scientist, who has abandoned earth for the satellite to dedicate his life for science along with his aging friend the genius Dr Simon Wright. Wright senses his death, and decides to implant his brain in a mechanical container. They both manufactured a superior robot and an android. Captain future dedicated his life to fight evil along with his three men, the brain, android, and robot.

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Mazinger Z

Mazinger Z (Japanese: マジンガーZ, Hepburn: Majingā Zetto, known briefly as Tranzor Z in the United States) is a Japanese super robot manga series written and illustrated by Go Nagai. The first manga version was serialized in Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump from October 1972 to August 1973, and it later continued in Kodansha TV Magazine from October 1973 to September 1974.

PLOT
Mazinger Z is an enormous super robot, constructed with a fictitious metal called Super-Alloy Z (超合金Z, Chōgokin Zetto), which is forged from a new element (Japanium) mined from a reservoir found only in the sediment of Mt. Fuji, in Japan. The mecha was built by Professor Juzo Kabuto as a secret weapon against the forces of evil, represented in the series by the Mechanical Beasts of Dr. Hell. The latter was the German member of a Japanese archeological team, which discovered ruins of a lost pre-Grecian civilization on an island named Bardos, the Mycéne Empire. One of their findings was that the Mycene used an army of steel titans about 20 meters in height. Finding prototypes of those titans underground which could be remote-controlled and realizing their immense power on the battlefield, Dr. Hell goes insane and has all the other scientists of his research team killed except for Professor Kabuto, who manages to escape. The lone survivor goes back to Japan and attempts to warn the world of its imminent danger. Meanwhile, Dr. Hell establishes his headquarters on a mobile island, forms the new Underground Empire, and plans to use the Mechanical Monsters to become the new ruler of the world. To counter this, Kabuto constructs Mazinger Z and manages to finish it just before being killed by a bomb planted by Hell’s right-hand person, Baron Ashura, a half-man, half-woman. As he lays dying, he manages to inform his grandson Kouji Kabuto about the robot and its use. Kouji becomes the robot’s pilot, and from that point on battles both the continuous mechanical monsters, and the sinister henchmen sent by Doctor Hell.

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